The Cardboard Creations of Chris Gilmour

Artists use a variety of materials for not only inspiration but also manufacture. Chris Gilmour takes the homely cardboard box and transforms it into something beautiful. Born in the United Kingdom in 1973, he now lives and works in Italy.

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Cafe Racer, Chris Gilmour (2010)

Inspired by objects from daily life, Gilmour infuses his creations with the detail that makes his viewers look twice. While his artwork is not interactive, the memories and potentiality of action his works evoke make you think you could hop on Cafe Racer and drive off. But the illusion, though deeply satisfying, stops at the surface.

I choose objects for their visual appeal and cultural resonance, but I also usually choose objects which imply an action or interaction of some sort. — Chris Gilmour

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Skateboard, Chris Gilmour (2011)

Gilmour began his work using pristine cardboard to maximize the illusion of his life-sized creations. Presently, though, he keeps stickers and labels on the artwork. While fooling the eye in one sense, he makes it clear these are cardboard fabrications. And, he likes it that way. From an interview recorded on his site, he states, ” I think it gives another dimension to the work to use scrap cardboard packaging which has been thrown away after the coveted objects it contained have been removed.” It is this very reason I find Gilmour’s work so inspiring. It turns a traditional packaging material on its head. Now, the material itself becomes precious versus what was originally inside. So, the next time your son or daughter asks to play with that cardboard box from your new refrigerator or dryer, let them. You may be inspiring the next generation of artist!

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Wheelchair, Chris Gilmour (2003)

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